Beautiful Creatures – making up is easy

‘I believe that all women are pretty without make up – but with the right make up can be pretty powerful.’

– Bobbi Brown, Cosmetics Entrepreneur

Make up has always been used by men and women to enhance our physical appearance for aesthetics and theatrics whether it is for pleasing ourselves, to attract others or to keep up with fashion. Doing our make up is not only a habit that is used to express ourselves, there has been numerous innovations throughout time in what is now a profitable cosmetics industry.

OAZJ98y6
Goddess – Roman Egyptian shared on Museum Week

In the book Painted Faces – A Colourful History of Cosmetics by Susan Steward, she writes: “In the past, cosmetics were just as likely to be worn as visible markers of social status or religious expression of gender, wealth, health and wellbeing: that is to say, the meaning beyond mere decoration. Women and, at certain times in history, men have applied cosmetics to improve. Alter, even to camouflage or disguise their appearance and have used cosmetics extensively to as a clue to their health, wealth and social status”. There is a long history of body adoration in all civilisations and make up has seen many innovations and developments in it base products. Susan Stewart continues “Dispute the rhetoric, in reality cosmetics formed an integral part of culture of the great civilisations of Greece and Rome under a variety of aromatic herbs, plants roots, flowers, woods, fruits, seeds, and gum resins for cosmetic purposes’. Even in the Roman times, beauty products were sold almost door to door by street traders as well as at regular markets in the town forums. The books presents the popularity and importance of cosmetics then: “In fact cosmetics, through increased trade brought about by the Roman Empire, became quite widely available. In short, in terms of cost and availability – there was something for everyone and everyone used cosmetics”.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

With this in mind, there is no wonder I have a natural love of making up when I can. I already mentioned in this blog that in my childhood, I used to go home in my lunch break in my first primary school, and would occasionally put on my mother’s lipstick. I also used to like when our neighbour gave me a haircut and then I would get to wear a little lipstick that day. I also loved nail polish but in secondary school – there was a strict ban on makeup and nail polish at school. It is self-explanatory why I wear them most of the time now! My mother has a lot of sisters and this too influenced me to like ‘girly things’. Seriously though, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, my aunties would give us or pass on clothes, but also send packets of high-end branded makeup from Canada, such as Estee Lauder, Clinique, and Dior. I actually used to play with some expensive products then, and later realised that those products were high quality and expensive!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Avon was also sold by women agents who came ‘house to house’ in our village. Avon are still a business that has some beneficial strengths for cosmetics sellers, as well as buyers. There direct selling models are still unique today and is particularly useful for empowering women in developing countries. Marketline ‘Avon Products Inc’ reports: “Avon is the 5th largest beauty company in the world and is by far the biggest direct selling enterprise globally with 6.4 million active representatives, who then turn around and sell Avon’s lipstick and lotions to the end user”. The company went through a period of change at the 2000s but it seems to have survived with its’ core offering: “changing lifestyle and rising disposable income are leading to growth in cosmetics and personal grooming market. Increasing demand for events and parties with an increased number of beauty conscious customers, social status and emergence of ecommerce are aiding market growth. Unique business model supported by a portfolio of well-recognised brands in the market, has been enabling Avon to sustain its competitive position in the market”.

Therefore, Avon is a business model that enables women across the globe to ‘earn something on the side’ to supplement their income. I was truly surprised about 6 years ago when a local contact asked me to have a browse of her Avon catalogue. I have a constant demand for nail polish, so I ordered some good and reasonably priced Avon gel nail polish. I bought it intentionally to support her. I also met an employee of Avon doing research in the library where I was more than happy to tell her how well the brand is recognised and commended their Corporate Social Responsibility programme. Long may they reign with their flexible business model opportunities and branded products.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I have always worn a bit of makeup, but in the 1990’s makeup in the UK was not a big deal and I noticed that not everyone was ‘into it’. However in the last 10 years or so, cosmetics has seen a revival since the flamboyant New Romantics day of the 1980s. This has been helped with social media and the Internet. According to Global Data Online, millennials are spending more and engaging a lot on cosmetic products: “S-Commerce (social media commerce) is becoming integrated into everyday life and could be a long-term game-change”. Cosmetic fans are consuming, writing, reviewing it, promoting makeup on social media by blogging, producing videos, demonstrating live tutorials, and creating other exciting content.

Instagram is buzzing with beautiful tips and product reviews. I know that some people feel the pressure of social media and absolutely loath it, but for those who can handle its’ faults – it is great for getting creative ideas, especially for make-up. There are some good recommended blogs and web resources that are informative as well as full of inspirational ideas. Some of these are Marie Claire Best Beauty Blog, BBC Article and Guardian writer Sali Hughes on Beauty.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Superstar Rihanna has also created her own brand of makeup called ‘Fenty Beauty – beauty for all with a “focus on embracing products for a wide range of traditionally hard to match skin tones, creating formulas that work for all women and pinpointing universal shades”. The launch of Fenty Beauty was a sign of movement in the beauty industry, pushing more content for diversity in terms of colour, especially in foundation lines.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

In Trinidad and Tobago, we have a long standing and strong makeup brand called Sacha Cosmetics. I remember buying some items in the late 1980s, especially as the colours are suited to women of colour. The founders of Sacha Cosmetics have received awards for innovation in products and entrepreneurial substance. I was also told by my friends that the company is one of the bestselling online cosmetics and has a successful market in the Caribbean, North American and Panama. My friend recently gave me some Sacha makeup that are world-class and ethically made cruelty-free.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Cosmetic are popular everywhere in the world and there is a thriving market for makeup artists. A lot of people have their makeup done by professionals for special occasions, and thay can come to you at your mutual convenience. Makeup artists can freelance and it is a viable business. You can also book a appointment on an app, or with a department store like Blow Ltd via Debenhams. If you prefer a more tradition make up advice or session with an expert, some makeup brands have them in store in their shops, such as in Chanel and MAC in St Pancras train station.

When I got into the music industry, I wasn’t focused on being the most famous artist or even getting a major record deal. It was just to make music on my own terms or create my own image, do my own hair, do my own makeup. – Janelle Monae

We can’t really wear makeup all the time, especially in our downtime. However, it is super that everyone can look after themselves with some TLC, and apply a little bit of makeup, if and when require. Makeup will always be important for personal and social reasons as it is a way to feel good about oneself, express individuality, allure confidence and make that fashion statement.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Makeup Is Art, Beauty Is Spirit.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s